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Coffees help send local kids to camp

Lauren MacGill

Winkler and Morden Tim Hortons owner Linda Doerksen and crew Betty Froese, Liane Isaak and Reina McClain served coffee to raise money for kids to go to camp.

Winkler and Morden Tim Hortons owner Linda Doerksen and crew Betty Froese, Liane Isaak and Reina McClain served coffee to raise money for kids to go to camp.

WINKLER/MORDEN - 

On May 31, popular coffee chain Tim Hortons was buzzing with activity as the public came out and bought coffee to send local kids to camp. The yearly event sees 100 per cent of the proceeds from coffee and special Camp Day bracelets go toward sending deserving local kids to camp.
“Every year this community is amazing,” Winkler and Morden Tim Hortons owner Linda Doerksen said. “It’s unbelievable how people will come out and they know about Camp Day now, they know what the program is about, and just simply buying a coffee can help send a kid to camp.”
The Camp Day program has been running since 1975, and more than 150,000 kids have attended a Tim Horton Children’s Foundation camp since that time.
Between the Winkler and Morden locations, Tim Hortons raised $9,600. That means they will send six kids to camp this year instead of four, at their new location in Whiteshell Provincial Park. The kids going to camp are made up of campers from previous years, who will be attending a leadership camp to expand on the skills they learned previously.   
“They learn about the importance of teamwork,” Big Brothers Big Sisters executive director Michael Penner said. “They learn about their own leadership capabilities, and they always come back from camp really excited to participate in the community and [camp] ultimately makes them better people.”
The kids sent to camp will participate in many of the typical camp activities like canoeing and crafts, and will learn valuable leadership skills as well. “It really helps these kids grow,” Penner said. “[Camp] gives them new experiences that they wouldn’t have otherwise. Through that, they grow in self-esteem and get more confidence in their abilities.”
“I think Tim Horton himself wanted to support kids in every way he could, and my husband and I have been in this business for thirteen years,” Doerksen said. “It really is, for us, about the kids. It’s a really good feeling to be able to give back.”
“Every business should be supporting their own community whichever way they can,” Morden Tim Hortons manager Sarah Friesen said. “I just think it’s a great day, it’s one of our favourite days of the year.”