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Grand opening near for Boyne School

Emily Stobbe-Wiebe

The grand opening of the Boyne School will also give people a chance to buy Memorable Stories of Carman and Area. (EMILY STOBBE-WIEBE/VALLEY LEADER)

The grand opening of the Boyne School will also give people a chance to buy Memorable Stories of Carman and Area. (EMILY STOBBE-WIEBE/VALLEY LEADER)

The Boyne School will be open to the public Saturday, June 24 from 2-4 p.m. An opening ceremony, tours, refreshments and cake will be included in the special grand opening event. Additionally, the book Memorable Stories: Carman and Area: Celebrating Canada’s 150th, published by the Dufferin Historical Society, will be on sale.

Dufferin Historical Society President Trish Aubin said she is ecstatic about the project being done.

“It’s been a long, long road but it’s very satisfying and very rewarding.”

Aubin believes the restoration of the Boyne School is a great addition to the community and the museum.

“It’s more accessible. More available to utilize a lot more,” she said. “Out [on Highway 3] it was just sitting idle. Now it’s fixed up.”

The Boyne Schoolhouse will complement the two previously-existing museum buildings – the log house and the main building – by providing a more hands-on space for direct learning and experience.

“We see it as some place where we hope that teachers can bring a class and teach in a one room school,” said Aubin. “It will give kids the feel of what it was like.”

The Boyne School is unique among many historical schoolhouses because it closed relatively recently: in 1966.

“There are a lot of people that are still in the community that have gone here,” said Aubin. “There are teachers in town that are 90 years old that taught here.”

Stories like that of the Boyne School are included in the book, Memorable Stories, which will be sold at the grand opening of the Boyne School.

Dufferin Historical Society committee member Shirley Snider hopes the book will encourage people to write down and remember their own stories about Carman even if they think they don’t have any.

“If you don’t write these things down, then they’re going to be forgotten,” she said.

Preserving stories for the future generations is what drives Aubin to do the work that she does.

“I want to see the museum stay open so that the next generations will have a chance to enjoy it and learn about the history,” said Aubin.

Snider agrees with Aubin’s motivations for being active in the local historical community.

“I guess that’s why I am involved in the museum and the Heritage Committee,” said Snider. “It’s like doing a jigsaw puzzle. You have to find the missing piece.”

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ewiebe@postmedia.com