Opinion

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (L) shakes hands with his Japanese counterpart Shinzo Abe at their joint news conference at Abe's official residence in Tokyo, Japan, May 24, 2016, ahead of the Ise-Shima G7 summit meetings. REUTERS/Toru Yamanaka/Pool

Canada-Japan trade pact more crucial than ever

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's government should reconsider Japan's singular focus on finalizing the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) free trade agreement, the largest such compact in the history of the planet, and move simultaneously toward a bilateral trade pact with Canada.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivers a formal apology for the Komagata Maru incident in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Canada, May 18, 2016. REUTERS/Chris Wattie

Apology helps us learn from historic wrongs

Justin Trudeau last week became the third prime minister in recent history to use the floor of the House of Commons to offer a much overdue formal apology to families of Asian groups hurt by Canada's racist policies that sought to exclude them from settling here or singled them out for harsh treatment.

African Development Bank President Akinwumi Adesina (L) talks with Ghana President John Dramani Mahama (C) and Ivory Coast President Alassane Ouattara (R) during the Africa CEO Forum in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, March 22, 2016. (REUTERS/Luc Gnago)

Ghana's democracy risks losing peaceful standard

On a continent where tyrants rule, civil strife is a fact of life and elections are free only in name, the West African country of Ghana has emerged as an oasis of peace and tranquility and the acknowledged standard-bearer of democratic governance.

Sexual exploitation grows as world gets smaller

It's a small world, we say, when we bump into an old classmate halfway around the world, or reunite with a former neighbour online. The pat phrase is wrapped in a warm blanket of nostalgia. But the things that make it a small world -- cheap air travel and the Internet -- have made it a much more dangerous place for many of the world's children.

Canada's Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett (R) speaks during a news conference on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on January 26, 2016. REUTERS/Chris Wattie

UN declaration vow leaves a lot unsaid

Depending on whom you ask, Canada's newly stated promise to implement the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is either a catastrophe that will cripple our resource economy or the start of a golden age between the Crown and aboriginals.

Libyan prime minister-designate Fayez al-Sarraj (L) and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry attend a news conference in Vienna, Austria, May 16, 2016. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger/Pool

West plays waiting game in ongoing Libyan mess

When "Prime Minister" Fayez al-Sarraj of the "Government of National Accord" (GNA) arrived in Libya a month ago, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said it was "not the time for obstructionists to hold back progress." A noble sentiment, but it does make you want to ask Kerry: When would be the right time for obstructionists to hold back progress? N

Bombardier workers assemble a CSeries aircraft in their plant in Mirabel, Quebec on April 29, 2016. REUTERS/Christinne Muschi

Liberals must act soon on Quebec questions

Consider the spectrum of important, inevitably controversial, economically and politically crucial Quebec-related questions facing the federal government. It's a growing and increasingly daunting list.

<p>Edmonton Eskimos quarterback Mike Reilly raises the Grey Cup after his team defeated the Ottawa Redblacks in the CFL's 103rd Grey Cup championship football game in Winnipeg, Manitoba, November 29, 2015. REUTERS/Mark Blinch

Getting life lessons from the gridiron

We spend so much time discussing the latest roster moves of our favourite football teams that we often lose sight of the life lessons that emerge from the teams' locker room and offices.